Click to return to Main Contents PageClick to return to Main Contents PageBirds Photo Galleries
Page 2


Contents Page

Birds Index
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Other Animals

All photographs on these pages are the property of the photographer Brian Tuohey.

They may not be re-published in any form without written permission, but may be downloaded for personal use.

Requests for commercial or charitable use of these or any other photographs will be considered.

Please do not link directly to pictures, but links to this page are welcome.

Coal Tit | Collared Dove | Dunnock | Goldfinch


Coal Tit

When I first saw coal tits in the garden, they would not take seed from the feeders, but by the end of 2008, they had become one of the commonest birds at the feeders.  They are one of the smaller tit species.

Coal tit Coal tit

Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window

Top


Collared Dove

Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window

The first 6 pictures here are the most recent, taken in August 2006.  Earlier pictures are shown below.

The distinctive calls of collared doves have been familiar to me for many years, long before I could identify which bird was making them

In spite of their abundance in my local area, it was unusual to see them in the garden, but gradually they started flying in, and after a while they began to take seed from the feeder, although they can only do this when a tray is attached.

Collared doves are probably the biggest of the birds that come to the feeders.  I find them enchanting because of their gentleness and timidity, and slightly comical in the way that they waddle uncomfortably around the tray on the feeder .  In spite of their size they show very little aggression towards the smaller birds and it is not uncommon for a collared dove to be feeding from one of the lower feeding ports while a smaller bird is perched just above, feeding from an upper port.  What a contrast with the aggressive behaviour of the starlings!  

It is also nice to see them in pairs.  Usually one flies in first, often landing on the top of the feeder before flying down to the tray.  Its mate then normally joins it as they feed together.  Nowadays, collared doves are very welcome daily visitors.

Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture, 800x600 - opens in a new browser window

Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window
Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window


Top


Dunnock

Also known as a Hedge Sparrow, I thought I'd spotted one of these during 2007, but it wasn't until February 2008 that I managed to photograph and identify it.

Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window Click for larger picture - opens in a new browser window

Top


Goldfinch

Very distinctive birds with their red faces and flash of yellow on their wings, I used to see goldfinches at the feeders several times a week.  The bird without the characteristic red and black face markings in some of the earlier pictures (August 2003) is a young goldfinch.  More recently, through 2007 and into 2008, their numbers in the garden have dropped markedly and they seem to be infrequent visitors.  Updated May 2008 (the first 2 photos).

Goldfinch, May 2008 Goldfinch, May 2008

Dec 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Dec 2003 - 800 x 600 pixels Dec 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Oct 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Oct 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Nov 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Nov 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Aug 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Aug 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels Aug 2003 - 640 x 480 pixels
Nov 2003 - 480 x 640 pixels Nov 2003 - 480 x 640 pixels

 

Top

Updated 28/12/08